Sample Lesson

Characteristics of an Engaging Lesson:

  • Is well planned
  • Grabs students’ attention
  • Maintains students’ attention
  • Builds on previously learned concepts
  • Is content driven
  • Establishes real life connections
  • Provides students with active learning opportunities
  • Builds critical thinking skills
  • Is talked about and remembered
  • Is continuously tweaked

Lesson Outline-Music

Lesson Part Activity description/Teacher does Students do
Formal/Informal Assessment of Prior Learning or Preassessment (Sequence start) Begin by reviewing what was learned in the previous lesson. “Last lesson, we talked about what bees look like and their body structures. Can anyone remember a body part of the bee that we learned last lesson?” Students will access prior knowledge of bees and their body parts. Students will try to recall what was learned in the last lesson.
Title Why Do Bees Buzz?
Standard EALR 2-Music

The student uses the artistic processes of creating, performing/presenting, and responding to demonstrate thinking skills in dance, music, theatre, and visual arts.

GLE: 2.1.1-Understands and applies a creative process to create music.

  • Explores musical elements to create music.
  • Uses ideas and skills to create music through guided exploration.
  • Performs music for self and others.

 

Central Focus (CF) The central focus is to explore why bees buzz and apply a creative process to create music.
Learning Target

(LT)

Students will explore why/how bees buzz and demonstrate through a song. “I can explain why bees buzz and demonstrate through a song.” Students will read the learning target.
Instruction

Inquiry

Preview

Review

·Now that we know what bees look like, can we figure out what bees sound like? Explain that today we will be focusing on the noises bees make (sub concept), and even try to sound like a bee ourselves!

·Ask students if they have ever heard a bee before. Then ask if they can help you figure out which of these noises belongs to a bee. Play audio clips in order: dog, cat, elephant, bee. Ask students how they knew which animals were bees and which were not.

·So why do bees make that buzzing sound? Explain to students that bees buzz because of their wings. When an insect flies, the size of its wings and the speed of their flapping affect the sound they make. Small wings push against less air than big wings do, so they have to beat faster in flight.

·Write this on the board as our definition to our sub concept. This will remain on the board for the duration of the lesson.

Students will listen to audio clips and determine which animals are bees (examples) and which animals are not bees (counterexamples).
Informal Assessment ·Ask class: do bees sound like this? (make barking noise).

·Can everyone make the sound a bee makes?

·What body part of the bee makes that sound? Is it their antennae? That’s right! It’s their wings!

Students will respond to questions and make bee sounds when asked.
Practice Activity

Support

·Print out lyrics to song and hand out one to each student.

·Play the video on document camera and have students sing along.

·Try it a few times so students feel confident!

Students will sing along with the song.
Informal Assessment Now try singing the song without the music, just voices! Watch for students who need a little extra practice. Students will sing along with teacher.
Practice Activity

Support

·Have student get out their kazoo instruments.

·Explain to students that their kazoos make a buzzing sound, kind of like a bee! Tell students we will now all transform into bees and buzz along to the music.

·Once students are ready, have them play along with the music a few times.

·Extra challenge: if this is easy for students, try it again without the music, and look to see if they are getting the melody right.

Students will play along to the song on their kazoo instruments.
Closure Assessment of Student Voice Extra challenge: try to perform the song as a class, half with kazoos and half singing along.

·Ask students what sound a bee makes

·Ask students ways in which we can recreate that sound through music

Additional Practice: Give students an assignment to take home. Ask students to practice singing the song we learned in front of an audience member (could be a parent/sibling/friend). Students will need a parent signature as a part of their homework to return to class.

Students will answer questions when prompted.
Formal

Assessment or Postassessment

(Sequence end)

The formal postassessment will be conducted during the generalization experience. Students will attend generalization experience and participate in formal postassessment.


Materials Needed:

  • Audio clips:

Dog: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LulScBMT-Sg

Cat: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A9gknsvMOG4

Elephant: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cQzV_p8fJ9U

Bee: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HqdcosScsYg

Yellow Bumble Bee

The leaves, are green, because they’re colored by the sun.

And the flowers, so many colors, each and every one.

 

All I want to be is a yellow bumble bee,

Buzz buzz buzz in the bumble tree.

Yellow bumble bee, yellow bumble bee,

Buzz, buzz, buzz, buzzing along.

 

The sky, is blue, I want to fly around like you do.

To the flowers, so many colors, rainbow drops of dew.

 

All I want to be is a yellow bumble bee,

Buzz buzz buzz in the bumble tree.

Yellow bumble bee, yellow bumble bee,

Buzz, buzz, buzz, buzzing along.

Buzz buzz buzz buzzing along.

 

All I want to be is a yellow bumble bee,

Buzz buzz buzz in the bumble tree.

Yellow bumble bee, yellow bumble bee,

Buzz, buzz, buzz, buzz buzz.

 

All I want to be is a yellow bumble bee,

Buzz buzz buzz in the bumble tree.

Yellow bumble bee, yellow bumble bee,

Buzz, buzz, buzz, buzz buzz.

 

This is an effective lesson because it is well planned and builds on prior knowledge and previously learned concepts. It adds to and makes connections to other lessons in a series. This lesson is clearly aligned to a standard that will enhance student learning. It provides students with active learning opportunities as they work on making connections to animals and their sounds. It encourages teamwork by practicing group performance. Depending on time, there are options to extend the actives to further challenge the students. The teachers are supporting student learning throughout this lesson using formative assessment strategies.

 

References:

Meador, D. (2016, October 16). Creating a Great Lesson to Maximize Student Learning. http://teaching.about.com/od/pd/fl/Qualities-of-a-Great-Lesson/htm

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